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Right of Return

Doc Jazz
Language: English

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[2011]
Lyrics, music and performance by Doc Jazz.

A song about the inalienable right of Palestinians in the Diaspora to return to their homeland. Featuring Susanne Alt on saxophone. Jawhara on background vocals. All other vocals and instruments by Doc Jazz.
You are like the olive tree
Just like you were meant to be
Though your roots dig -deep into the land
They were uprooted by a savage hand

But the ties were forged through centuries
A bond so strong and fixed in history
You are the land and the land is you
A solid unity they never can undo..

Cherish your leaves, let your branches bear your fruits
All you need to do – is protect and feed your roots

The old will die, but the young will learn
The road is long and it will twist and turn
But when you know your destiny
You know where you need to be
And we always will believe
It's our Right to Return..

Black on white they wrote that vow
But to act on it was not allowed
Empty words like a carrot on a stick
Ink is fading as the clock goes on to tick

Dispossession and racial oppression
Every psycho form of Zionist aggression
Was condoned by that very same force
Though they say our rights are still endorsed

We don't need your words, they're just empty talk
Why don't you just keep on talking while we walk the walk

The old have died, but the young are strong
We know who we are -and where we belong

With the key in our hand
We'll come home to our land
We know we will always stand
for our Right of Return..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why don't you just keep on talking while we walk the walk

The old have died, but the young are strong
We know who we are and where we belong

With the key in our hand
We'll come home to our land
We know we will always stand
for our Right of Return..

Contributed by giorgio - 2012/3/26 - 08:15


Notes

(1) In this song, Doc Jazz addresses the new generations of Palestinians living in the Diaspora. In the first verse they are compared to the olive trees of Palestine. They are inseparable from the Palestinian landscape; they are an important part of the identity of the land and the people of Palestine. Over one million of these precious trees have already been uprooted by the Zionist invaders, and this uprooting is compared in the song to the violent expulsions of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians from their land in 1948 and 1967. The younger generations are called upon to cherish their roots.
'Right of Return' also gives a defiant reply to the infamous words of the first Prime Minister of the Zionist state, Ben Gurion, referring to how Palestinians will deal with their expulsion. He said: «The old will die, and the young will forget». In this song, Doc Jazz stresses that the young will not forget, but on the contrary will learn the history of their land, and cherish their connection to it. Both choruses underline the fact that even future generations of Palestinians will not accept their diaspora, and will hold on to the keys of their original family homes – determined to return to Palestine.
The verse after the first chorus refers to the promises made in the United Nations. UN resolution 194 affirms the right of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes, but Doc Jazz criticizes the fact that these words have never been put into practice. In the verse after that, the song also illustrates how that same UN body that affirmed these rights also endorsed the ethnic cleansing of Palestine by recognizing the Zionist state in 1948. The bridge after that confirms that this issue must be decided by the Palestinians, and that the right of return is not a matter of ink on paper, but an inalienable right that must be exercised: let them talk the talk, while we walk the walk.

giorgio - 2012/3/26 - 08:44



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