Lingua   

Biko

Peter Gabriel
Lingue: Inglese, Zulu, Xhosa



Ngomhla sibuyayo
Ngomhla sibuyayo
Ngomhla sibuyayo, kophalal'igazi!
Ngomhla sibuyayo
Ngomhla sibuyayo
Ngomhla sibuyayo, kophalal'igazi!
Bakhala uVorster!
Bakhala uVorster!
Ngomhla sibuyayo, kophalal'igazi!
Ngomhla sibuyayo
Ngomhla sibuyayo
Ngomhla sibuyayo, kophalal'igazi! [1]

September '77
Port Elizabeth weather fine
It was business as usual
In police room 619

Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Yihla moja, yihla moja [2]
The man is dead
The man is dead

When I try to sleep at night
I can only dream in red
The outside world is black and white
With only one colour dead

Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Yihla moja, yihla moja
The man is dead
The man is dead

You can blow out a candle
But you can't blow out a fire
Once the flames begin to catch
The wind will blow it higher

Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Yihla moja, yihla moja
The man is dead
The man is dead

And the eyes of the world are
watching now
watching now.

Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na?
Senzeni na? Senzeni na? [3]
[1] The excerpts from the South African struggle song [1] and [3] are not usually sung in live performances, and appear only in studio versions. Nevertheless, they are parts of the original song. The first song, Ngomhla sibuyayo (in Zulu and Xhosa: “When we return”) is a folk music. Here's a rough English translation:

When we return
When we return
When we return, there'll be perfect silence!
When we return
When we return
When we return, there'll be perfect silence!
Vorster piangerà!
Vorster piangerà!
When we return, there'll be perfect silence!
When we return
When we return
When we return, there'll be perfect silence!




[2] From the chorus of the well known hymn of the African National Congress, Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika, originally written by Enoch Sontonga in 1897. The hymn is now South Africa's national anthem in a multilingual version (Zulu, Xhosa, English, Afrikaans). The Xhosa words mean: “Come down Holy Ghost”.

[3] From the anti-apartheid struggle song Senzeni na?, written around 1950. Senzeni na means: "What we have done?"



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